Columns

War on science coming from left

We’ve been told conservatives don’t believe in science and that there’s a “Republican war on science.” But John Tierney, who’s written about science for The New York Times for 25 years and now writes for the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal, told me in my latest online video, ...

Woody Guthrie’s music celebrated ‘just plain folks’

Where’s Woody when we need him? In these times of tinkle-down economics — with the money powers thinking that they’re the top dogs and that the rest of us are just a bunch of fire hydrants — we need for the hard-hitting (yet uplifting) musical stories, social commentaries and inspired ...

What killed Martin Luther King?

MEMPHIS — Martin Luther King’s men had a different question. At least, according to his aide, Andrew Young, they did. When the first reports went out that King had been gunned down while standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in this city, America and the world demanded to know one ...

Chennault helped Nixon sell out peace to win presidency

WASHINGTON — On March 30, 94-year-old Anna Chennault died, a shadowy figure in the 1968 presidential campaign of Richard Nixon. What history will remember her for is the pivotal role she played in Nixon’s victory — a role that, if it had been widely known at the time, might have deprived ...

50 Years of white what-ifs

America’s white working class has never had a champion more eloquent than the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I don’t mean to suggest that this was his mission, but it was the inevitable outcome of his generosity of spirit. King was the central force of the civil rights movement for black ...

Trump must break free of isolationist clutches in Syria

The isolationist spirit — a reluctance to become involved in foreign entanglements — goes back in U.S. history to Thomas Paine and his 1776 pamphlet “Common Sense” and to George Washington’s 1796 Farewell Address. In modern times, the isolationist spirit had a strong pull against ...

Like Lincoln, King now belongs to ages

One of the best things about the passage of historical time is how the partisanship of a given moment melts away. If you’ve seen the musical “Hamilton” (or paid attention in civics class) you’d know that long before George Washington left office, the Founding Fathers were bitterly ...

When $63 million doesn’t buy working toilets

When 450 students arrived at Anacostia High School in the District of Columbia’s southeast neighborhood on April 4, they found that few of the sinks or toilets were functioning and the cafeteria was flooded. They were advised by the Department of General Services to use the facilities at a ...

Creativity is not related to intelligence or rewards

Well before 1400, the Aztecs discovered the fruit of a vine-like orchid and began using it as a spice. Its value was then discovered by the conquering Spanish who brought this black flower back to Europe. The tasty spice gained in popularity with kings and queens due to its unique flavor, ...

Breaking: Fake news vs. ‘Fake news’

WASHINGTON — When fake news blasts traditional media for being “fake news,” how does one respond? Do you shout, I’m not fake, you are? Do you ignore the charge? If you don’t fight back, are you affirming the fool? If you do, doth thou protest too much? The risk of doing nothing, ...

Hints for Candidates: raise $, have fun, go with blue

Successful politicians, those who have won election and re-election to office, almost always have an extra olfactory nerve that somehow endows them with the ability to smell which way the political winds will blow in a given election year — and whether a gale-force blast is forming that might ...

Poisonous Taxes for Poorest People

Soda will cost you more in Philadelphia, Seattle, Boulder, Colorado, and a bunch of California cities because politicians in those places voted to tax it. The social engineers claim soda taxes will “reduce obesity,” “lower diabetes rates,” “reduce medical costs,” etc. But the ...

Leaf spritzers ignore roots of gigantic US economy

Sometimes, it’s useful to state the obvious. Here’s a fact, for example, that we all know to be true: America’s economy is enormous. It’s worth saying that out loud and repeating it to ourselves and others, because today’s Powers That Be (economic, political and media) are wrongly ...

Let common sense prevail on guns

So there you are, cowering under your desk. From the hallway, you hear the pop! pop! pop! of gunfire, along with the shrieks of the terrified and moans of the dying. The good guy with a gun? Maybe he’s crouched outside the building. Maybe he’s dead in the break room. Whichever, he’s not ...

Carnival barker with war-hawk yes-men lead country

At a time the American presidency is engulfed in domestic and foreign policy crises requiring the attentions of our best experts in both realms, we continue to be led by a crude and unschooled carnival barker who has populated the bureaucracy with know-nothings and adoring cronies. His first ...

‘Wonder Woman + Me’ uplifting message

At some point during the March for Our Lives in Columbus, Ohio, I walked behind two young girls wearing star-spangled blue capes. The one with the ponytail kept looking around at the crowd of thousands, as if she couldn’t believe her eyes. The other girl marched face-forward, holding up a ...

Bolton’s enemies say something about qualifications

Among the ways to judge a person’s fitness for office are the enemies he has made. In the case of John Bolton, President Trump’s choice to become national security adviser, those who oppose his appointment — liberals, neocons and some Republicans all with differing worldviews and ...

At least Stevens honest on repeal call

Two and a half cheers for Justice Stevens! Let me say it up front: I don’t think we should repeal the Second Amendment. But I applaud retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens for arguing that we should. In case you missed it, Stevens penned an essay for The New York Times in which ...

This budget is what’s considered conservative?

Donald Trump woke up on Friday, March 23, and realized that a deficit-ballooning $1.3 trillion “omnibus” spending bill was awaiting his signature. The law increases defense spending but otherwise completely fulfills the spending priorities of the Democratic minority. Some have even said ...

Trump’s Epic Marketing Battle

What’s worrying isn’t that Donald Trump is now getting advice about public policy from fanatics such as John Bolton and Lawrence Kudlow. Trump has never cared about public policy. The real worry is that with special counsel Robert Mueller breathing down Trump’s neck, and with several ...