Houghton, Keweenaw 4-H youth give strong showing downstate

HANCOCK — Nineteen Houghton-Keweenaw County 4-H members were among over 2,100 other youth ages 11 to 19 years of age at the Michigan State University (MSU) campus in East Lansing for the 4-H Exploration Days. The event took place from June 19-23, according to Anne Kretschmann, MSU extension 4-H coordinator for Houghton and Keweenaw counties. “Keweenaw-Houghton County had the highest participation rate for the two counties at this event with 19 youth attending,” Kretschmann said. Youth from the two counties attended their choice of over 200 sessions ranging from activities designed to explore their passions, hobbies, possible career paths, and other cultures, according to Kretschmann. This year’s 19 local participants chose to learn about topics such as working K-9 search-and-rescue dogs, model rocketry, dying with plants, Teen Social Justice League, pellet rifle (safety), emergency career services careers, food art, map and compass (orienteering), a bug’s world, money smart investing and exploring Asian food, Kretschmann said. The 4-H Exploration Days program is designed to increase participant’s confidence, independence, responsibility, accountability, problem solving, decision making, and time management skills. Kretschmann said youth enhance their communication and leadership skills, as well as citizenship skills. The program develops and expands youth career and personal interests through session taught by MSU faculty and staff members, 4-H volunteers, and other experts. Attendees also develop social and academic skills necessary to transitioning to college life and later as an adult.

HANCOCK — Nineteen Houghton-Keweenaw County 4-H members were among over 2,100 other youth ages 11 to 19 years of age at the Michigan State University (MSU) campus in East Lansing for the 4-H Exploration Days. The event took place from June 19-23, according to Anne Kretschmann, MSU extension 4-H coordinator for Houghton and Keweenaw counties.

“Keweenaw-Houghton County had the highest participation rate for the two counties at this event with 19 youth attending,” Kretschmann said.

Youth from the two counties attended their choice of over 200 sessions ranging from activities designed to explore their passions, hobbies, possible career paths, and other cultures, according to Kretschmann.

This year’s 19 local participants chose to learn about topics such as working K-9 search-and-rescue dogs, model rocketry, dying with plants, Teen Social Justice League, pellet rifle (safety), emergency career services careers, food art, map and compass (orienteering), a bug’s world, money smart investing and exploring Asian food, Kretschmann said.

The 4-H Exploration Days program is designed to increase participant’s confidence, independence, responsibility, accountability, problem solving, decision making, and time management skills.

Kretschmann said youth enhance their communication and leadership skills, as well as citizenship skills. The program develops and expands youth career and personal interests through session taught by MSU faculty and staff members, 4-H volunteers, and other experts. Attendees also develop social and academic skills necessary to transitioning to college life and later as an adult.

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