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Dollar Bay Honor Roll rededicated on Monday

Graham Jaehnig/Daily Mining Gazette The village of Dollar Bay hosted a rededication ceremony of their veterans honor roll, Monday morning as part of their Independence Day celebration.

OSCEOLA TOWNSHIP — Dollar Bay kicked off the community’s Fourth of July celebrations a day a day early, with rededication of the Honor Roll at the Veterans Park Ball Field.

State Representative Greg Markkanen and Senator Ed McBroom were on hand to speak at the ceremony.

“The 110th District has a high concentration of veterans,” Markkanen said, “so, it’s only right that we’re here to honor their service and their sacrifice to our nation.”

Markkanen said that as a veteran himself, he felt the responsibility to be present at the ceremony.

Senator McBroom, who spoke following Rep. Markkanen said it is an honor to participate in such events.

“It’s always particularly poignant when you have these opportunities to recognize our veterans,” McBroom said, “and particularly those that we honor on this honor roll today who have passed away.”

Among those honored on Monday were five veterans killed during WWII and three in the Vietnam War. The WW II veterans honored are:

• William Finnegan, a Bessemer native, born in 1897. Finnegan, a 24-year Navy veteran, had enlisted in the Service in 1917, subsequently achieving Chief Radio Technician in 1929. With war again imminent, Finnegan again offered his services to the Navy. In Nov. 1941, he became a communications officer on the battleship Oklahoma. Finnegan was among the 429 sailors on the battleship killed in action on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. In addition to numerous awards from his previous 24 years of military service, Finnegan was awarded the Purple Heart.

• William J. Frost, U.S. Infantry veteran who served with the 36th Div., was killed in action near Cassino, Italy, on Feb. 12, 1944. His awards include the Purple Heart, the WW II Victory Medal, the Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal and the Combat Infantry Badge.

• Joseph C. Isaacson, a navigator on a B-17 bomber plane, with the 457th Bomb Group, was killed in action on Nov. 2, 1944, on a bombing mission, Issacson’s 30th, to destroy a synthetic oil refinery at Merseburg, Germany. Isaacson was awarded the Purple Heart, the WW II Victory Medal, the Europe-Africa-Middle East Campagne Medal, and the Air Medal with four stars.

• US. Army Privat Peter Mickelich, born in 1912, served in Company K, 3rd Battalion, 314th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division. Mickelich was killed in action on June, 27, 1944, while his company was attacking a German strong point near Cherbourg, near the beaches of Normandy. Mickelich was awarded the Purple Heart, the WW II Victory Medal, the Europe-Africa-Middle East Campagne Medal and the Combat Infantry Badge.

• William Sved was killed in action on Nov. 8, 1942, on the first day of the invasion of North Africa in the U.S. II Corps. Sved was awarded the Purple Heart, the Bronze Star, the Combat Infantry Badge, the WW II Victory Medal, and the Europe-Africa-Middle East Campaign Medal.

The Vietnam War veterans honored are:

• David Cavis, 2nd Lt. killed in action on Feb. 22, 1968. Cavis’ awards include the Purple Heart, the Silver Star, the Bronze Star, the Army Commendation Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, the National Defense Medal, the Purple Heart, and the Combat Infantry Badge. His Silver Star and picture are on display in the lobby of Dollar Bay High School.

• Sergeant Edward L. Kolka, a squad leader in Delta Company, 1st Bat. 26th Inf. 1st Inf. Division (the Big Red One), was born in Apr. 1947 and grew up in Point Mills. Killed in action on March 2, 1968. Kolka’s awards include the Silver Star, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, the National Defense Medal, the Combat Infantry Badge, and the Purple Heart.

Sergeant Dale B. Moilanen, born in June, 1947, was killed in action on Feb. 1, 1972, serving in Delta Company.

“We give honor to those to whom honors is due,” Sen. McBroom said, drawing similarities between today’s honor rolls and veterans memorials to the Old Testament “ebenezers,” stones of remembrance in Samuel’s day that became altars to the Lord.

“Why was that done?” McBroom said. “It was done so that when the children in the future would say, ‘Why are these here?’ Their parents could tell them the story: This is here because of what they did. This is to cause us to remember.”

McBroom said that like those memorials of the Bible, memorials such as the Dollar Bay Honor Roll, is to remind the people, and to give everyone cause to tell children in the future:

“We are here because of what they did; because of the sacrifice they made, and we don’t forget that.”

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